Tag Archive | Malawi

An ending

It has been almost exactly a month since I left Africa, flying first from Johannesburg back to Dar for one last round of goodbyes, and then onwards from there.

It already feels like a dream.  The first time I saw a giraffe. The way Lake Malawi glimmers as the sun sets. Touring Kigali on the back of a motorbike.   Watching the world spin below me from the top of Kilimanjaro. Shivering next to a pool of boiling lava in the Congo. Drinking red wine and eating pizza and talking books at Saverios Restaurant in Dar.  An afternoon with a family of mountain gorillas in Rwanda.  The dusty red roads of Kampala.  Kissing a giraffe in Nairobi.  The Tanzanian line dance on my 30th birthday.  Christmas in Ethiopia.  Swimming in a waterfall in Madagascar.  Laughing until I cried in Maputo.

These things that I know to be true.  The sunset is most spectacular in Zimbabwe, the sky most beautiful in Madagascar, the water most blue off the coast of Tanzania.  Maputo has the best egg tarts, Dar the best Indian food, Ethiopia the best coffee.  On a good day, it takes 24 hours to drive 400 kilometres in Madagascar, 15 hours to cover the same distance in Malawi, 12 hours in Tanzania, anybody’s guess in Mozambique.

There are good people everywhere, more parts happiness than sadness.  One day, a child in Goma smiled at me and gave me a piece of lava, from the volcanic eruption that destroyed his family home.  I carry it in my purse. Another day, a woman sitting beside me on a long bus ride bought me some bananas, a piece of manioc, and a bag of peanuts.  She didn’t speak English but she smiled at me when I thanked her.  I carry this with me too.

When the picture accompanying this post was taken, I was sitting on the beach with four people I had met a day earlier, eating crabs we had marinated in garlic and tomatoes, drinking a 2M beer, and talking about tides and wind patterns and 3 am departure times.  A picnic spread out on the canvas sails we had removed from the boat to use as a tablecloth.  Happiness in the form of a poem.

I carry all of it with me.

I counted the stars in Madagascar.  I know I am very lucky, both for the adventures and the people I have met along the way.

These are the things I have learned.

Money matters

Shortly before I arrived in Malawi, CAD $1 was equivalent to about 150 Malawian Kwacha.  Today, $1 equates to 250 Malawian Kwacha.  Last week the government released new 1000 Kwacha notes, as a response to the rapid inflation (the previous highest denomination was 500 Kwacha).  There are posters all over town advertising the new currency and prices are shooting up.

The littlest big city

Blantyre is supposedly Malawi’s biggest and busiest city.

There are two traffic lights in town.  There are cars.  A supermarket.  A bank.  A restaurant that serves pizza.  Most of which I have not been able to find elsewhere in Malawi.

And, yet, in many ways Blantyre is more like a village than a city.  I can walk around the city limits in about half an hour.  Nobody really abides by the traffic lights.  And the restaurant with pizza was closed when I stopped by.

There is not much to do here except wait for my visa for Mozambique to be processed.

Heading south

For the past week, I have been working my way south along the beautiful blue Lake Malawi.  From Nkhata Bay to Senga Bay to Monkey Bay to Cape Maclear, where time disappears in the yawn of an afternoon.